News

Can we talk for a moment about the awkward sextet that is Nicola Sturgeon, Theresa May and their legs? It won’t be news to you that the Daily Mail has caused a storm by making the meeting between two of the world’s (Europe’s?) most powerful women about their pins.

As with most modern tragedies, it was the Guardian and its readers who were hit hardest.

Poor Owen Jones was frightfully het up, although not lost for words, as he wrote with considerable pent up enthusiasm about the ‘open sewer’ that is the right wing press.

Of course, much as it begrudges me to admit it, Owen’s right. These pillars of British democracy (lol Theresa) represent something far more important than a well-matched pair of skin tone tights. You know that, and I know that. And guess what – the Daily Mail knows that too. But what the Daily Mail has twigged about the British public, that we may not yet know ourselves, it that we also love to be outraged. Paul Dacre is sitting somewhere rubbing his hands with glee as smoke starts to billow from the nation’s noses – I don’t know about you, but it’s the first time I’ve visited the Daily Mail website in a while.

In these testing political and financial times, there’s nothing we love more than a good rant. As a teacher, I’ve been told that it’s frowned upon to let my rage out on the kids, so I’m forced to get my kicks elsewhere. Here’s a few things not on the political spectrum that have outraged me this week:

  • Seeing a topless (male, calm down boys) jogger. It’s March. March!!!
  • How cheap Tesco own brand soy milk is.
  • How watery Tesco own brand soy milk tastes.
  • When the guy in front of me dawdled down the M4 slip road at 30 on my way home.

It seems apt that May’s response to the madness was to ignore it. Makes sense – she’s too busy running the country to respond to something so beneath her. Don’t like the Daily Mail headline? My advice would be not to buy it. Instead, check out Oh Comely magazine, have a cup of tea, and be thankful we have more sense than the front-page news.

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